miércoles, 24 de junio de 2009

CYRANO

QUERIDA AMIGA,

TE ESCRIBO SOBRE LA IDEA DE HACER UNA VERSIÓN DEL CYRANO DE BERGEREAC DE ROSTAND. SI ALGUIEN NO SABE QUIEN ES SIEMPRE A INVESTIGAR, POR FAVOR. YA SE HIZO UNA VERSION EN HOLANDA EN 1973 Y QUE SE ESTRENO EN BROADWAY EN 1993, CON MALAS CRITICAS Y SIENDO UN FRACASO ECONOMICO Y DE CRITICAS.
LA IDEA DEL CYRAO, AUN SIENDO MUY BELLA NO ES UNA QUE ME IENTERESE EN LO PERSONAL. SON GUSTOS. PEROD ESDE YA GRACIAS POR APORTARMELA. SIEMPRE SIRVE. SI QUERES O QUIEREN SABER MAS SOBRE ESTE ENTRANDO EN YAHOO Y PONIENDO CYRANO THE MUSICAL, VERAN ESCENAS.. ACA TE TARNSCRIBO LO QUE DICE WIKIPEDIA Y LA CRITICA DE NUEVA YORK DEL NEW YORK TIMES.

O SEA, MAS ALLA DE LA BUENISIMA Y GENTIL IDEA DE PROPONER, ¿NO SERIA FANTASTICO, COMO ACABO DE HACER PARA ACLARAR PUNTOS A MI AMIGA, HACER LO MISMO CON TODO? Y DE ESA MANREA SE PODRAN INFFORMAR Y VER MUCHO DE MUSICALES.


Cyrano: The Musical
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For the 1973 musical adaptation, see Cyrano (musical) and Cyrano.
Cyrano
The Musical

Original Broadway Playbill
Music Ad van Dijk
Lyrics Koen van Dijk
Peter Reeves
Sheldon Harnick
Book Koen van Dijk
Based upon Edmond Rostand's classic Cyrano de Bergerac
Productions Holland
1993 Broadway
Cyrano: The Musical is a musical with an original book and lyrics by Koen van Dijk, English lyrics by Peter Reeves, additional lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, and music by Ad van Dijk.

An English translation of a Dutch production, it is based on Edmond Rostand's classic 1897 play of the same name focusing on a love triangle involving the large-nosed poetic Cyrano de Bergerac, his beautiful cousin Roxane, and his classically handsome but inarticulate friend Christian de Neuvillette who, unaware of Cyrano's unrequited passion for Roxane, imposes upon him to provide the romantic words he can use to woo her successfully in mid-17th century Paris. Its style is closer to that of the pop operas Les Misérables and The Phantom of the Opera than a traditional Broadway book musical.

After 38 previews, the Broadway production, directed by Eddy Habbema, opened on November 21, 1993 at the Neil Simon Theatre, where it ran for 137 performances. The cast included Bill van Dijk as Cyrano, Anne Runolfsson as Roxane, and Paul Anthony Stewart as Christian, with James Barbour and Jeff Gardner in supporting roles.



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Review/Theater: Cyrano: The Musical; Cyrano's Flights Have Touched Down On West 52d Street
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By BEN BRANTLEY
Published: November 22, 1993, Monday

Credit the many people involved in turning "Cyrano de Bergerac" from a lyrical, swashbuckling French play into a Dutch musical into a $7 million English-language musical with at least one success: its plot is as easy to follow as a synopsis laid out in Cliffs Notes.

Indeed, for all its technologically sophisticated sets and elaborately orchestrated score, "Cyrano: The Musical," which opened last night at the Neil Simon Theater, comes across as a lavishly illustrated study guide, with many helpful, cipherlike characters in sumptuous historical costumes taking pains to explain who they are and what they're doing. It is not unusual for songs to include phrases like "But let me tell you what happened yesterday" or "Roxane, so you're still here. It must be seven years."

Now such clarity of exposition may be a virtue. But it doesn't leave much room for the rhapsodic infatuation with words that was at the heart of Edmond Rostand's 1898 masterpiece of theatrical hokum and was the very lifeblood of its title character, the long-beaked, poetic-souled chevalier of 17th-century Paris.

Even though the lines are almost entirely sung (this "Cyrano" is more a pop-operetta than a conventional musical), so many of them are devoted to expositional recitative that the entire work feels closer to textbook prose than poetry. As directed by Eddy Habbema (who also staged the production in Amsterdam, to great success), it is a fairly efficient piece of storytelling. But it seldom gets much closer to Rostand's heady flights of rodomontade and romanticism, or truly felt emotions, than an entry in a reader's encyclopedia.

Don't put too much blame on Bill Van Dijk, the Dutch actor who created the title part in the original version and stars again here. He is a likable and charming performer, who sings in English with a clarion voice and un-self-conscious fluency. But he lacks the titanic presence of a character who has created, through flamboyantly heroic words and gestures, an outsized aura commensurate to the size of his legendary nose.

In his dueling scenes, Mr. Van Dijk is scrappy but curiously inept. And, urging his fellow soldiers on to glory through death in the play's climactic battle scenes, he seems more like a spunky mascot than a charismatic leader.

The biggest problem, however, in raising this Cyrano into the theatrical empyrean where he belongs lies not with Mr. Van Dijk but with the show's lyricists: Koen Van Dijk, who wrote the original book and score in Dutch; Peter Reeves, its English lyricist, and the Broadway veteran Sheldon Harnick, who is credited with "additional lyrics." (Just to get this out of the way, the show's composer is Ad Van Dijk, and none of these Van Dijks are related.)

The writers have been unable to find a way of translating the bravura linguistic arias Rostand gave his title hero with any comparable flair. The most famous of them, in which Cyrano offers 19 stylistic variations on ways to make fun of his nose here shrivels into a limp succession of rhymes -- "a snorer or a borer or an odor explorer," for example -- that are hardly the stuff of verbal pyrotechnics. Most of the lyrics, actually, are simply functional and as unquotable as recipes.

Most of Cyrano's grand gestures, both physical and verbal, tend to get lost amid the truly spectacular multiple changes of Baroque-flavored scenery by Paul Gallis (often achieved with the gasp-inducing use of hydraulic lifts) and the successive ensemble scenes of crowds in opulent period costumes by Yan Tax. These grandiose set pieces keep coming at us so rapidly and dazzlingly that they don't really have a chance to establish their reason to be. And some of them, like an unbearably cute dancing-nun sequence in the convent to which Roxane has retired at the play's end, should have been scrapped long ago.

Ad Van Dijk's music, which recalls the mechanically propulsive score of "Les Miserables," keeps the plot marching, marching, marching along at a military clip, with suspenseful shadings of orchestral dissonance in the background. For the scenes involving the triangular love story between Cyrano, his beautiful cousin Roxane (Anne Runolfsson) and the handsome but inarticulate Christian (Paul Anthony Stewart), for whom Cyrano provides the words to court the woman both men love, the music shifts into a romantic pop tunefulness that suggests the ballads from the Disney cartoon fantasies "Beauty and the Beast" and "Aladdin."

The famous balcony scene, in which Cyrano plays eloquent prompt-master to the tongue-tied Christian, still retains vestiges of its comic poignancy. But, for the most part, the characters have all the individualized vividness of figures in a history pageant.

The principals generally sing pleasantly and cleanly, although the amplification system sometimes makes it difficult to tell who is singing what. Ms. Runolfsson has a flexible voice that shifts, with crowd-pleasing virtuosity, between ethereal melodiousness and piercing big-moment resonance. She is a curiously stalwart Roxane, more at home visiting the lines of battle than in the misty tableaux that place her on a platform against a full moon, where she looks like Glenda the Good Witch in "The Wizard of Oz."

That round, melancholy moon hovers symbolically over much of the evening. In one of the more memorable scenes from the original, Cyrano actually pretends to be a visitor from the moon, who expatiates whimsically on his travels through the stars.

In a way, of course, Cyrano is from the moon, from a realm of vaulting fancy that disdains the paltriness and mediocrity of the society in which he finds himself. In this new version, that kinship is absent. Cyrano sees the moon as a distant, omniscient watcher who looks down on him with a "cold objective eye." He actually tells it, "Yes, I know you perceive the reason why I can never tell Roxane what she means to me."

Clearly, this "Cyrano" and its title character will always be grounded on the earth. Cyrano: The Musical Book and lyrics by Koen van Dijk, based on the play by Edmond Rostand; music by Ad van Dijk; English lyrics by Peter Reeves; additional lyrics by Sheldon Harnick; directed by Eddy Habbema; associate director, Eleanor Fazan; set by Paul Gallis; costumes by Yan Tax; lighting by Reinier Tweebeeke; sound by Rogier van Rossum; orchestrations by Don Sebesky and Tony Cox; musical director, Constantine Kitsopoulos; musical coordinator, John Miller; production stage manager, Bob Borod; technical supervisor, Roy Sears; special effects by Gregory Meeh; fight director, Malcolm Ranson, executive producer, Robin de Levita. Presented by Joop van den Ende, in association with Peter T. Kulok. At Neil Simon Theater, 250 West 52d Street, Manhattan. Man and Captain de Castel Jaloux Geoffrey Blaisdell Le Bret . . . Paul Schoeffler Ragueneau . . . Ed Dixon Christian . . . Paul Anthony Stewart De Guiche . . . Timothy Nolen Roxane . . . Anne Runolfsson Valvert . . . Adam Pelty Chaperone . . . Joy Hermalyn Montfleury . . . Mark Agnes Cyrano . . . Bill van Dijk Mother Superior . . . Elizabeth Acosta Novice . . . Michele Ragusa





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11 comentarios:

Cyranus dijo...

Señpr cibrian, pues es usted un señor con todas letras, mi nombre es andres, aunque use un seudonimo, fenomeno muy comun en internet, con sorpresa y ansias lei su comentario sobre hacer un musical con la obra de Cyrano de Bergerac, obra por demas bella, llena de lirismo y sentimientos nobles, de ser asi, espero poder verla, recientemente pude ver su obra Otelo, en mi provincia, Tucuman, el "interior" pues somos la parte interna que da vida a este pais, por eso no me parece peyorativa esa designacion.
Ademas pude disfrutar en dos ocasiones de Dracula, pero sin Rodo ni Milone, sino en una gira que hizo en el año 98 y la otra en el año 99, unos años mas adelante la obra regreso a tucuman con ambos pero me fue imposible asistir, la obra regresara de gira solo para festejar los 20 años?
Quisiera agradecerle haber creado estas obras, a otras las pude disfrutar desde el audio, pues no vinieron a mi provincia, o cuando lo hicieron no pude ir a verlas.
Siga adelante, somos muchos los que esperamos sus creaciones.

ANA LAURA PRENS dijo...

GRACIAS PEPE....AMIGO...SI YO LO VI EN UN MUSICAL EN FRANCES...POR MI PARTE ME GUSTO...
PERO UNO NUNCA SABE LAS REPERCUSIONES VISTE
EL MUNDO MUSICAL ES MUY COMPLEJO
TE AGRADEZCO EN EL ALMA TU RESPUESTA
TE QUIERO MUCHO
PERO MUCHO
Y COMO DECIS VOS...AUNQ NO NOS CONOZCAMOS SOMOS COMO UN AMOR PLATONICO..JAJA
YA VOY A IR A VERTE A UN ESTRENO
TEQUIERO PEPE
GRACIAS
ANA LAURA DE LOMAS DE ZAMORA

dolores dijo...

Hay PEPE...es demasiado

SOMO DEL INTERIOR ........segun algunos y
encima , estamos CON LA GRIPE A.......y estos,,,,,,,,,,,,,,los politicos que se llenan la boca , que nos van a cuidar,,,,,,,,,,,,nos dejan , mas externos ....que nunca
POR ESO TE ESCRIBO, por que comprendes que tu interior , hace a lo exterior
Y estamos TAN SOLOS ...tan carentes
NO te vayas........quedate ....Diria Ma Elena Walsh.....en su Barco Quieto
No te vayas ...........Quedate con tu ...........INTERIOR a ese......que nos dejan......morir , desaparECER???? SERA LO MISMO?
LA PUTA MADRE .........que alguien mire el interior CARAJO

NUESTRO INTERIOR............se esta literalmente ..............MURIENDO


Y yo
TE ADORO.......MI PEPE AMIGO........
AYUDANOS A SOÑAR.........PORFI

romina szmyr dijo...

Hola pepe querido! Te cuento que el lunes no pude viajar por esta gripe porcina... ocurrio una desgracia, murió un alumno muy querido mio por un empeoramiento de su salud causado por la gripe, en verdad me costó mucho poder viajar porque no estaba muy bien debido a la noticia y me quedé con su madre y su hermana, mientras pasaba este feo momento... solo queria agradecerte porque el seminario en Mardel estuvo muy emotivo, ya algo al respecto dije en la devolución, pero nuevamente quiero agradecerte, pude seguir comprendiendo muchas cosas más al llegar a Tandil y al recordar el curso... Un beso enorme y un gran abrazo... quien está en amor con vos... Romina

Anónimo dijo...

no hagas cyrano...pensa en la propuesta de ser el Zeus de Eco y NArciso....ademas pensa que seria algo mas que original...por lo que sé todavia nadie le sacó el jugo a tanta historia junta!!!!!contestame!y cuidate de la gripe
Marta

Anónimo dijo...

pepe que pasa con el estreno de 30 dìas se hace igual o se posterga??

Anónimo dijo...

hola pepe soy fernando de rosario. Antes que nada quiero felicitarte por q me encantan las producciones que hacen y me da gusto cada vez que vienen poder disfrutar del espectaculo. El motivo del comentario es para pregungtarte como hay que hacer para ir algun casting tuyo ya que yo estudio comedias musicales y me quiero dedicar a esto, te comento que el año que viene me voy a estudiar a buenos aires ya que me surgio la posibilidad.

Desde ya muchas Gracias


Ferr

Anónimo dijo...

Pepe soy fer de rosario devuelta me olvide de darme mi mail por cualquier cosa q me puedas y quieras avisar cuando se haga algun casting. Desde ya muchhas Gracias

fernandoayoso@hotmail.com

Manuela Perin dijo...

PEPE AMADO!

EXTRAÑAMOS TUS COMENTARIOS! VUELVE!

COMPARTO ESTE VIDEO MARAVILLOSO QUE ME ENVIO UN AMIGO POR MAIL.

TE QUIERO MUCHO MUCHO, Y COMO YA TE LO DIJE, GRACIAS POR TODO.

BESITOS
MANU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QERUjf8fbII

Laila azul dijo...

Querido Pepe:
Al fin me animo a escribirte, este mensaje es para agradecerte y decirte gracias! Soy de rosario, una de las tantas personas que tomo el seminario de Otelo, aquella tarde en el teatro el circulo… También tuve la oportunidad de verte cuando viniste con el seminario de fantasma de canterville, me acuerdo ese día, era mi primer seminario con vos, un sabado a la tarde en el teatro Broadway, estaba esperando sola para entrar y pasaste justo por al lado mio, en ese momento creo que mi corazon se paro, no lo podia creer, tenerte tan cerca y poder compartir aquellas horas de aprendizaje, que conmovieron mi corazón, con el final de la canción de tu musical de 30 dias, que me acuerdo que estaba emocionadísima llorando, viniste y me abrazaste. Quiero decirte gracias, gracias por ser ese icono para mi, fuiste mi primer musical con Las mil y una noches, fue el primer musical que vi, recien eran mis primeros años en las comedias musicales y nunca me voy a olvidar ese sentimiento que habia arriba de ese escenario, esa pasion y emocion que nunca habia visto antes, era algo tan maravilloso que nunca antes habia visto, Despues de haber visto tu musical, sabia que era lo que realmente me gustaba, y cual era mi pasion por la vida, me di cuenta que era lo que me hacia feliz… Es increible esos sentimiento que uno siente arriba del escenario, es impresionante como desaparecen los problemas y tu mente te deja llevar por el corazon… Uno se deja llevar por aquellos sentimientos dichos… Es Magia! Como vos nos dijiste en tu seminario. Gracias por abrir mis alas, gracias por la magia, por la pasion, por las emociones, por tu talento, por tus palabras y tu dedicacion que hacen que podamos apreciar tu maravillosa pasion por lo mas hermoso del mundo, las comedias musicales, gracias por ayudarme a empezar a volar..


Un saludo enorme, y arriba el telon que el show debe continuar
Laila Azul
Klarysima2025@hotmail.com


[Se sienten en una burbuja y nada pasa a su alrededor. Sólo esa música suave y profunda, que se mete como un perfume dulce entre sus suspiros]

Maria Gabriela dijo...

Que pasa Pepe?, te extraño !!!